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Behavioral Health Education

Buckeye cares about the wellbeing of the communities we serve. Behavioral health is just as important as physical health and creating awareness is a priority. When members face behavioral health challenges, Buckeye offers support and programs to help. We address conditions like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, substance abuse and more. Our case managers partner with providers to coordinate care, treatment and services, including hospitalization. Our network of medical professionals can provide the full range of therapies, counseling and treatment. Buckeye supports our members on every step of their journey.

October is Mental Health Awareness Month

Each year, millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition. However, mental illness affects everyone directly or indirectly through family, friends or coworkers. Despite mental illnesses’ reach and prevalence, stigma and misunderstanding are also, unfortunately, widespread (NAMI, 2020). 

The Impact of Stigma on Substance Use Disorders

David L. Nalls, ASB, CDCA, QMHS, CPI, PRS
Community Health Worker, MED-Connections
Buckeye Health Plan

The social stigma that houses fear and reluctance for people with substance use disorders, has been rooted in the lack of individual, organizational, judicial, medical, social and civil institutions knowledge of the condition.  Many of them continued to enforce rhetoric and or business functional protocol that challenges moral systems and not address the medical condition that substance use disorders produces.

To really get serious about stigma is to become serious about discrimination.  There is a prejudice that looms in the undertone of words used to define a person with an SUD. Stigma hinders the progress of individual growth in the sight of society and is the backdrop of some treatment agencies.  The policies created by governmental agencies to help individuals with SUDs are hindered in their efforts to build policies that assist with reintegration and recovery.  Polices that support individuals moving from benefits into work, from stagnation to flourishing.

Substance Use Disorder is largely coupled with criminal activity, however not all people living with this disease engage in criminal activity. The vacuum of stigma has created a stereotype that keeps people entrenched in the problem by tagging a host of slanderous labels that dehumanizes character.  Addict alcoholic, junkie, crack head, meth head and dope fiend have caused considerable damage in communities abroad. These labels can cause a great fear and that fear prevents people from seeking help.  The following settings have unwittingly perpetuated the promotion of stigma:

  • Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers
  • Pharmacies
  • Hospitals –(staff)
  • Dentists
  • Social Services
  • Employment
  • Housing
  • Criminal Justice Systems.

Stigma has a broad base, it has had a major impact in treatment and the labels reinforce the negative views of the masses.  It is evident, without reconstruction of social education concerning SUD individuals will continue to be treated as a problem with a person and not a person with a problem.  Any suggestion that drug users deserve compassion and care rather than punishment and control threatens to undermine system of social acceptance created at the expense of individuality.

We have scientific evidence today that SUD is not a moral problem but a medical condition that cannot be managed simply with a moral compasses.  Although choices have an impact on individual growth and change, the process is different in everyone.  Words matter, if you what to help someone grown in life treat them as a person and not a problem; speak with care, compassion and let it all come from the heart.

“Today, I am challenging those of us who work within this special ministry to be more assertive in sharing the transformative power of recovery with all those we encounter socially and professionally and to share the privilege we have experienced as a guide and witness to such transformations. The public is constantly bombarded with addiction’s bad news; it’s time we shared with them the good news of recovery. Each time we introduce ourselves and what we do to a new acquaintance stands as a potential community and cultural intervention. We too are the faces and voices of recovery–regardless of our recovery status.” William L. White

References:

William L. White – Blog & New Postings

UK Drug Policy Commission (PDF)

Opioid Addiction

Ohio’s Opioid crisis, Cleveland Now
Video - Opiod Addiction - Looking for Signs
Laura Paynter, MA, PCC-S, CCM, ACHE
Sr. Director of Behavioral Health

Opioid PSA #1
Video -  Learning the Signs
Laura Paynter, MA, PCC-S, CCM, ACHE
Sr. Director of Behavioral Health

Opioid PSA #2
Video -  Learning the Signs
Laura Paynter, MA, PCC-S, CCM, ACHE
Sr. Director of Behavioral Health

Opioid Abuse Awareness, WTOL
Video - Opiod Abuse Awareness
Brad Lucas, MD, MBA, FACOG
Chief Medical Officer

Buckeye in the News - Opioid Awareness 
Video - Opiod Abuse Awareness
Brad Lucas, MD, MBA, FACOG
Chief Medical Officer

Article

Substance Abuse Programs Fight Opioid Epidemic in Ohio

 


Teen Vaping

Teen Vaping PSA
Video - Laura Paynter, MA, PCC-S, CCM, ACHE
Sr. Director of Behavioral Health

Buckeye in the News - Vaping
Video - Brad Lucas, MD, MBA, FACOG
Chief Medical Officer

Teen Vaping, Cleveland Now 
Video - Laura Paynter, MA, PCC-S, CCM, ACHE
Sr. Director of Behavioral Health

Teen Vaping Cleveland Now
Video - Dr. Michelle Blanda
Sr. Medical Director


Behavioral Health & COVID

Buckeye in the News: COVID-19 and Mental Health
Video - Dr. Brad Lucas, joins Cleveland Now
Brad Lucas, MD, MBA, FACOG
Chief Medical Officer

Article

Buckeye Health Plan Addresses Social Isolation and Loneliness During COVI9-Outbreak